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Mold Cause Pots?


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#1 Jacquie802

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Posted 16 June 2006 - 01:46 PM

Hi,

I'm just curious if mold can cause POTS?? My grandparents house is being redone (I stayed with them for 5 or 6 years) and they found mold in it. I got POTS after a viral infection, but I'm just curious if mold could have caused alot of the problems as well.

Jacquie

#2 worththewords

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Posted 16 June 2006 - 03:19 PM

Mold isn't good for anyone, even worse if you have allergies. I don't think it would cause POTS, however, it may contribute to you feeling more symptomatic.

#3 MotleyLori

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Posted 16 June 2006 - 06:09 PM

Allergies can cause POTS symptoms in susceptible people if I read the literature correctly. Histamines cause the heart to beat harder and faster. Mold is a well know allergen for a lot of people.

Lori

#4 Lukkychrm42

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Posted 16 June 2006 - 09:40 PM

I don't think there's anything corroborating a link between POTS and mold, but if you get infected with a fungal pneumonia or another fungal illness, I could see how it could cause the damage to the ANS that a virus could. (Bear in mind that they haven't established one particular virus as being a cause, they just assume that since viruses will get into the host cells to cause damage to various cellular functions, that it's not a bacterial infection (also since bacterial infections can be treated with antibiotics.))

#5 Kits

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 07:28 PM

I wonder about this too because I lived in an apartment at the time of onset that had black mold in the bathroom- that was clearly showing. Who knows how much was back behind the wall. We called the health department, but they won't do anything. We've even thought about asking for a tour, then I would fake pregnancy bladder and run into the bathroom- where I would sample the paint, water, ceiling etc. I guess my mom and I get carried away. Oh yeah- if you left anything to drip dry- you would get a florescent yellow ring on everything. The whole place had a constant smell. These were very expensive apartments too.
We still think we may go knock on the peoples door, tell them their apartment is toxic and ask for samples!!

#6 Guest_dionna_*

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Posted 20 June 2006 - 05:11 PM

funny thing. i first got my symptoms when i was stationed in alabama and there was mold everywhere and my parents really thought that the mold was making me sick. i think it was just a coincidence.

dionna B)

#7 sonshine456

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Posted 21 June 2006 - 12:51 PM

I found out a year after my POTS symptoms started that the apt I had lived in the previous year had to be completely torn apart because of the mold in the walls. INTERESTING!

#8 MotleyLori

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Posted 21 June 2006 - 01:15 PM

Do a quick search on Dr Blair Grubb and there is an article that mentions allergies causing histamine release which increases heart rate, etc. Mold is a potent allergen to many people but we can be allergic to anything.

Lori

#9 JaneEyre9

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Posted 05 July 2006 - 02:40 AM

I had to bring this back up because at the time i saw this topic, i wasn't able to post.

There are certain types of mold (not your garden variety fuzz on the fruit or mildew in the bathroom) that can release neurotoxins. If you google symptoms of toxic mold exposure (or some of the names-- stachybotrys, aspergillus, penicillium), you can read about some of the short term and long term effects of exposure. This is obviously not a common cause of neurological problems, but it can happen if you have been exposed to them for a certain period of time. Often, professional air testing and a specialist in environmental medicine can make a definite diagnosis.

I just didn't want the allergy thing to be the only thing posted here. It is very common for people to be allergic to mold, but there is a whole other type of mold reaction that is not allergy-based. I'm not saying that it causes POTS, but I wanted to throw out these facts about mold and neuro-illness.

#10 MotleyLori

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Posted 05 July 2006 - 06:23 AM

Mold - I hate molds! I am highly allergic to them and I live in NW Ohio. We have be deluged with rain for the past few weeks and the mold spores are high. My allergies are worse than they have been in July since 1988, the coughing, wheezing etc. Awful. I hope it dries out soon. Molds are nasty.

Lori

#11 rdslots

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Posted 05 July 2006 - 09:51 AM

Interestingly enough, I had to see an allergist many years ago, and he confirmed what I had already surmised -- mold and mildew, as well as pet dander, really wreaked havoc on my sinuses and head. I'm not sure I would make a correlation between the two, unless we are willing to entertain correlations between other things in our environments, too.

There must be something in our genes and environments, that pre-disposes us? My father has many of the problems I have, but he has suffered a heart attack brought about by arrythmias, and he says his mother was the same. Genetically, a female will inherit more from the father's side, and a male, from his mother's side -- so this much, at least makes sense to me. I also look at my own child, who was an extremely colicky baby, and the pediatrican determined she had not only an under-developed gastric system, but an under-developed nervous system as well. The colick, in spite of being breastfed, was symptomatic of the other, and I am holding my breath to see whether she will, in her lifetime, and if I am still around to see it, suffer from dysautonomia(s). Seems likely to me, in spite of the fact that, genetically, she should have more of her father's genes.